Share

Part 3: Long or Short ? Order Types And Calculating Profits & Losses

• How to calculate profit and loss

Calculating financial dataNow, let’s move on to calculating profit and loss:

Let’s use a pair without the U.S. dollar as the quote currency since these are the trickier ones:

1) The rate for the USD/CHF is currently quoted at 0.9191 / 0.9195. Let’s say we are looking to sell the USD/CHF, this means we will be working with the ‘bid’ price of 0.9191, or the rate at which the market is prepared to buy from you.

2) You then sell 1 standard lot (100,000 units) at 0.9191

3) A couple of days later the price moves to 0.9091 / 0.9095 and you decide to take your profit of 96 pips, but what dollar amount is that??

4) The new quote price for the USD/CHF is 0.9091 / 0.9095. Since you are now closing the trade you are working with the ‘ask’ price since you are going to buy the currency pair to offset the sell order you previously initiated. So, since the ‘ask’ price is now 0.9095, this is the price the market is willing to sell the currency pair to you, or the price that you can buy it back at (since you initially sold it).

5) The difference between the price you sold at (0.9191) and the price you want to buy back at (0.9095) is 0.0096, or 96 pips.

6) Using the formula from above, we now have (.0001 / 0.9095) x 100,000 = $10.99 per pip x 96 pips = $1055.04

For currency pairs where the U.S. dollar is the quote currency, calculating profit or loss is pretty simple really. You simply take the number of pips you gained or lost and multiple that by the dollar per pip you are trading, here’s an example:

Let’s say you trade the EURUSD and you buy it at 1.3200 but the price moves down and hits your stop at 1.3100….you just lost 100 pips.

If you are trading 1 standard lot you would have lost $1,000 because 1 standard lot of pairs with the U.S. dollars as the quote currency = $10 per pip, and $10 per pip x 100 pips = $1,000

If you had traded 1 mini-lot you would have lost $100 since 1 mini-lot of USD quote pairs is equal to $1 per pip and $1 x 100 pips = $100

Always remember: when you enter or exit a trade you have to deal with the spread of the bid/ask price. Thus, when you buy a currency you will use the ask price and when you sell a currency you use the bid price.

Move On Next Chapter: Part 4: What is Professional Forex Trading?

All Articles In This Category:

Part 1: What Is Forex Trading ? – A Definition & Introduction

Part 2: Forex Trading Terminology

Part 3: Long or Short ? Order Types And Calculating Profits & Losses

Part 4: What is Professional Forex Trading?

Part 5: What is Fundamental Analysis?

Part 6: What is Price Action Trading Analysis?

Part 7: Introduction to Forex Charting

Part 8: What Is A Forex Trading Strategy?

Part 9: Common Forex trading mistakes and traps

Part 10: What is Technical Analysis?

Part 11: How to Make a Forex Trading Plan

Part 12: The Psychology of Forex Trading

  1. […] Part 3: Long or Short ? Order Types And Calculating Profits & Losses […]

  2. […] Part 3: Long or Short ? Order Types And Calculating Profits & Losses […]

  3. […] Part 3: Long or Short ? Order Types And Calculating Profits & Losses […]

Leave a Comment